Colfax ponders name for new subdivision

By LeAnn R. Ralph

COLFAX — What should it be called?

That was the question Colfax Plan Commission members asked themselves at their January 12 meeting regarding the new subdivision on the Schindler property directly east of Dunn Street.

Going forward with the development, the property will need two names, one for the plat map and one for the subdivision itself, said Scott Gunnufson, chair of the plan commission.

Patrick Beilfuss of Cedar Corporation, who has been working with the plan commission, noted that the name of the initial plat could be something like the Schindler First Addition. Subsequent land purchases could then be called the Schindler Second Addition and the Schindler Third Addition.

Naming the addition for the property owner would not be something new in Colfax.

Certain areas of the village are known on the maps, for example, by the names of J.D. Simons’ First Addition and J.D. Simons’ Second Addition.

J.D. Simons was the founder of the village of Colfax back in the 1860s.

As for the name for the subdivision itself, Beilfuss said he had talked to Dunn County officials, who suggested that three or four names be generated.

No two subdivisions in Dunn County can have the same name, so if one name is already taken, coming up with a list of names will make it that much easier to select a name, he said.

The plan commission should ask the Schindler family for their ideas on what they would like for a name, said Gary Stene, plan commission member.

Stene suggested talking to Mary Schindler.

Gunnufson said that perhaps the name of Jim and Mary Schindler’s farm should be a consideration.

“We want a forward-thinking name that represents where our direction is going,” Gunnufson said, noting, too, that he had seen a subdivision in Minnesota with the name Inspiration.

“We need a fitting name to showcase what we want to do out there,” he said.

Beilfuss suggested coming up with a list of names, and then he could run it past county officials to make sure the names were available.

Nancy Hainstock, plan commission member, suggested mailing out a questionnaire to plan commission members or having members communicate by e-mail.

Communicating by e-mail could be a problem considering the state’s Open Meetings Law. The plan commission does not want to end up with a walking quorum, Gunnufson said.

A walking quorum occurs when officials on boards or commissions communicate outside of a properly noticed meeting and make decisions. Walking quorums can take place in a variety of ways when enough officials on a board to make a quorum discuss an issue and make a decision, such as over coffee, while eating at a restaurant — or by e-mail.

If the individual plan commission members respond back by e-mail only to Lynn Niggemann, the village’s administrator-clerk-treasurer, and not with each other, that will avoid the problem with a walking quorum, Beilfuss said.

As for a name for the Schindler subdivision, Stene suggested Fairview as one of the names on the list.

The Schindler farm is situated across the road from the Colfax Fairgrounds.

Fairview is now also the name of the street that runs along the fairgrounds on the west side and was formerly known as S.A.F. Park Drive.

Gunnufson said he would put the issue of naming the subdivision on the agenda for the next plan commission meeting.

Later on in the evening on January 12, the Colfax Village Board approved a motion authorizing Niggemann to send out questionnaires to village board members and plan commission members asking for naming suggestions for the residential development.

Twin home CSM

In other business, the Colfax Plan Commission approved a certified survey map (CSM) for the construction of a twin home on a lot on Iverson Road between existing property owned by the Eides at 605 Iverson Road and the Toycens at 609 Iverson Road.

Dave Rufledt, a contractor from Bloomer, and Krag Blomberg, a real estate agent with RE/MAX Affiliates out of Eau Claire, originally spoke to the Colfax Plan Commission at the May 6, 2014, meeting to outline the proposal for a twin home.

This project has been in the works for a year, and it has been taking a while to meet all of the requirements, Blomberg said at the January 12 plan commission meeting.

Closing on the property is planned for the end of the month, he said.