Boyceville officer-involved shooting results in one death

BOYCEVILLE — A domestic dispute call in the Village of Boyceville last Friday night turned tragic when a woman was shot and killed by a Boyceville Police officer.

Shonda E. Mikelson, 33, of Boyceville died when she was shot once in the chest by a uniformed Boyceville police officer after she refused to put down a rifle that she was holding and then pulled a hand gun from behind her back and pointed it at the officer.

At 9:09 p.m. Friday evening, November 14, the Dunn County Emergency Communications center received a call from a male subject in regards to a domestic situation at a Main Street home in the Village of Boyceville.

The caller had run to a neighbor’s house and called police. While on the phone, he reported that he had just been involved in a physical altercation with his girlfriend, identified on Monday as Mikelson, who was wielding a knife and was threatening to use it against him.

The uniformed Boyceville officer responded to the call and made contact with Mikelson at the home.

When Mikelson came to the door she was carrying a rifle in her right hand. The officer drew his service weapon and ordered her to drop the rifle.

Mikelson refused and then brought her left hand from behind her back, revealing a handgun that she pointed directly at the officer.

The officer, given the deadly force situation, fired a single fatal shot that struck Mikelson in the chest.

The handgun Mikelson was holding was later found to be a replica.

Boyceville Police Chief Dan Wellumson said that the handgun replica that Mikelson was holding was viturally indistinguishable from a real handgun.

“There were no distinquishing marks to say that it was not a real  handgun,” stated Wellumson.

“These replicas look just like a real handgun right down to the color, detail, materials used and sometimes weight,” the Chief added.

Wellumson said such replicas can easily be purchased in any stores that carries sporting goods and guns.

Detectives from the Barron County Sheriff’s Office were called to the scene and are conducting the investigation of the officer-involved shooting. Normally, the Division of Criminal  Investigation (DCI) which is part of the Wisconsin Department of Justice handles such cases but was already involved in another officer-involved fatal shooting in Chippewa County.

The Boyceville Police were assisted with scene security and reconstruction by the Dunn County Sheriff’s Office, Colfax Police Department, Durand Police Department and Wisconsin State Patrol.

As is protocol, the officer involved in the shooting was placed on paid administrative leave due to the pending investigation. The officer’s name is not being released at this time said Wellumson.

“This is a police department’s worst day,” said Wellumson of the shooting and death. “The only thing worse would have been if the officer had been injured or killed.”

Wellumson declined to comment on whether the Boyceville Police had had previous contact with the victim saying that such information would be made public once the investigation was completed.

According to her obituary on the Keehr Funeral Home website (www.keehrfuneralhome.com), Mikelson, who grew up south of Woodville in Eau Galle Township and graduated from Baldwin-Woodville High School in 1999, leaves behind four children, her parents, two brothers and several relatives. A private family service will be held.